Local Law 87 Energy Audits and Retro-Commissioning

By Peter Lampen, Vice President and Architect with DEPM

In our June 10th Blog Post, we talked about Local Law 84, one of four Local Laws enacted as part of the City’s Greener, Greater Buildings Plan (GGBP). Local Law 87 is another one that requires action on the part of property managers and boards. Starting this year we are working with properties to engage firms to perform Energy Audits and Retro-commissioning services as required by LL87.  Buildings will need to comply over the next ten years based on the last digit of the building’s block number, with the first buildings required to file by the end of 2013.  This is also a part of the City’s “PlaNYC Green Buildings & Energy Efficiency” initiative.

We are working with several of the most capable firms in the city to set up proposals for the LL87 services at lowest and best pricing for our managed properties.  The LL87 assessments and reports must be completed by certified agents.

There are two parts to LL87, an energy audit and a retro-commissioning report.  An Energy Audit will compile all utility usage data for the past several years and review all major components of the building including walls, windows, roofs, lighting as well as all energy-using equipment.

The energy audit report will present this data and list possible energy use reduction measures with budget costs and payback periods. The recommendations are not mandatory but are intended to help properties see opportunities for savings and to undertake the planning necessary to implement any selected measures.

The Retro-commissioning process looks at all energy-using equipment such as boilers, chillers, motors, fans, controls, sequences of operation and energy management systems.  The retro-commissioning report lists repairs and adjustments needed to bring the systems back to the level of performance when originally installed.  The repairs, adjustments and other measures listed in the retro-commissioning report are mandatory, and must be verified as completed by the retro-commissioning agent.

The energy audit and retro-commissioning report are combined into a single document for filing with the city.  A building can choose to engage an audit firm up to four years before their required compliance year, and can thereby benefit from the resulting energy savings sooner, as well as extending the time until a re-audit is required to ten years from their original compliance date.

For more information about the City’s plaNYC initiative, visitwww.nyc.gov/html/planyc2030. For more about the City’s Greener, Greater Buildings Plan and the four Local Laws that comprise it, visit nyc.gov/ggbp.

The Retro-commissioning Report analyzes the efficiency of all energy-using equipment in the building, from boilers to chillers and itemizes mandatory  repairs and adjustments needed to bring the systems as close as possible to their original level of performance.

The Retro-commissioning Report analyzes the efficiency of all energy-using equipment in the building, from boilers to chillers and itemizes mandatory repairs and adjustments needed to bring the systems as close as possible to their original level of performance.

 

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